See Me, See God

John 12:44-45 WEB

Jesus cried out and said, “Whoever believes in me, believes not in me, but in him who sent me. [45] He who sees me sees him who sent me.


When we reflect God, we obey the Bible. We care about the 10 commandments and the commandments of the New Testament. It is natural to bind the Word to our hearts, it reflects the Father. Additionally, we put away anger. Instead, we respond to people gently, even when they are rude. We do not try to get even or to justify ourselves. Instead, we are patient, caring more about the things of God than our egos. Finally, when we reflect God, we walk in love. We put away jealousy and bitterness in exchange for mercy, kindness, and grace. In our daily walk, we testify of God through our words and actions.

When we practice these basic principles, God is reflected to the people around us. We must separate ourselves from sin and come into obedience to the Bible. More, we must submit our goals to God. Are our goals truly Biblical reflecting the whole counsel of the Bible? Or do all our choices hang on one or two scriptures that speak of blessings? When we are purposed to reflect God to the world, we bring all these areas of “flesh” into obedience to the Scripture.

When we separate ourselves from fleshly indulgences we begin to look like Jesus. We both reflect God, and we reflect Jesus’ motivations. Like Jesus, we love to the point of laying down our lives. We are powerful to confront sin in other believers. We are passionate about getting people into a relationship with God. We also believe the Bible when we reflect God. We believe in heaven and hell and an eternal destiny so we realize the worthiest thing we can do to reflect God and imitate Jesus is to share the gospel with the lost.


Lord, please help me have the same motivations as Jesus. I long for those around me to see your love and goodness. Please help me witness to the lost. Help me focus on your priorities. Teach me to love others more than myself. Please help me bring my flesh into subjection to you. In Jesus’ name, amen.

Missing the Mark

John 7:40-43 WEB

Many of the multitude therefore, when they heard these words, said, “This is truly the prophet.” [41] Others said, “This is the Christ.” But some said, “What, does the Christ come out of Galilee? [42] Hasn’t the Scripture said that the Christ comes of the offspring of David, and from Bethlehem, the village where David was?” [43] So there arose a division in the multitude because of him.


The Pharisees did not reject Jesus because of where he was born. The Pharisees rejected Jesus because of prejudice in their hearts. They rejected him because he was a Galilean. Practically all Pharisees came from Judea. The idea of being associated with a Galilean was revolting to Judeans. So, the Pharisees did not take the time to find out more. There were people right there with Jesus who knew where he was born.

If the Pharisees had honestly inquired, they would have learned Jesus was born in Bethlehem. But instead, they assumed their prejudice was true. For this reason, they did not even inquire. So profound was their hate they would not even consider Jesus might be the Messiah. The Pharisees knew so much about the word of God and so little about true godliness.

Godliness is not being perfect. It is having a heart that seeks God’s ways. Take meekness for example. Meekness is not strictly a New Testament addition to the faith. In Numbers 12:3 the bible says Moses was meek above all men. So, the value of meekness was revealed in the Old Testament. Yet the Pharisees, with their hundreds of rules for serving God, did not have enough meekness to consider the possibility that Jesus was the Messiah. They lost touch with the personal God and turned the living God into an idol.

The Pharisees saw riff-raff when they looked at Jesus. However, if the Pharisees curried meekness the way they curried wealth and influence, they may have realized the truth about Jesus. The truth was Jesus fulfilled all the prophecies of the Old Testament. Yet because of prejudice, the most devoted of God’s followers did not see the Messiah.


Lord Jesus, please open my understanding that I can discern the things of God. Remove any blinders from my spiritual eyes and lead me into repentance if prejudice lives in my heart. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.  

Measuring Belief

John 5:45-47 WEB

“Don’t think that I will accuse you to the Father. There is one who accuses you, even Moses, on whom you have set your hope. [46] For if you believed Moses, you would believe me; for he wrote about me. [47] But if you don’t believe his writings, how will you believe my words?”


How many verses do you think are in the New Testament? There are just under 8000 verses in the New Testament. Of those many verses, there are a few Christians tend to ignore. For instance, “For I am afraid that by any means, when I come, I might find you not the way I want to, and that I might be found by you as you don’t desire; that by any means there would be strife, jealousy, outbursts of anger, factions, slander, whisperings, proud thoughts, riots;” (2 Corinthians 12:20 WEB) In this verse gossip is called slander and it is grouped with several other undesirable behaviors. Although it is clearly taught in the Bible to avoid talking about others, gossip seems to persist in most churches.

There are other examples in the New Testament such as, “nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor slanderers, nor extortionists, will inherit God’s Kingdom.” In this verse covetous also means greed. The church is bad about greed. Ministers talk excessively about blessings stirring up passionate desires in the congregants. Even Christian music teaches greed with excessive songs about blessings.

There are several passages in the New Testament that Christians tend to ignore. This suggests much of the church does not truly believe in Jesus. That seems absurd. Yet, it is what Jesus taught, “Many will tell me in that day, ‘Lord, Lord, didn’t we prophesy in your name, in your name cast out demons, and in your name do many mighty works?’ [23] Then I will tell them, ‘I never knew you. Depart from me, you who work iniquity.’” (Matthew 7:22-23 WEB) Gossip and greed are iniquities. They are both prevalent in much of Christianity.


Lord Jesus, please help me believe in you. Reveal to me the iniquities that I need to bring to you for healing and help. I do not want to get to the final judgment and find that I missed you. I trust your grace to see me safely through. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.

God Loves the World

For God so loved the world, that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish, but have eternal life. John 3:16 WEB

Often we hear preaching that speaks of the world derisively. Yet, in this passage, it clearly says that God loves the world. So, while it’s popular to condemn the world from the pulpit, it is not what God does. God does not currently condemn the world, rather, God wants to save the world. This is why Jesus was sent so that anyone who believes in Him will be saved. But here is the problem, when preachers condemn the world in one message and teach the great commission in another message they are defiling the word of God. The great commission is the command from the New Testament for the church to bring the lost into a saving relationship with Christ. However, Christians are often taught to hate ungodly people from the pulpit. What other outcome can there be from a message of condemnation? God does not condemn the world. Rather, he endured the cross so that the world could be saved. If anyone is going to be a soul winner for Christ, they have to love the lost. So, rather than defile the hearts of believers with an unbiblical message of present condemnation, preachers need to teach a message of love for the world.

Lord, help me to love the world without being defiled by the world. Help me to love people without letting their sin infect my heart. In Jesus’ name, amen.

Jesus’ Family Problems

John 2:1-5 WEB

The third day, there was a marriage in Cana of Galilee. Jesus’ mother was there. [2] Jesus also was invited, with his disciples, to the marriage. [3] When the wine ran out, Jesus’ mother said to him, “They have no wine.” [4] Jesus said to her, “Woman, what does that have to do with you and me? My hour has not yet come.” [5] His mother said to the servants, “Whatever he says to you, do it.”


This is one of the saddest texts in the New Testament. It’s the day Mary lost her close relationship with Jesus. You hear very little about Mary after this episode. In fact, the next time Mary is recorded as trying to connect with Jesus, He tells her she is not his family. (Mark 3:35)

Frequently, we make Jesus so divine we deny His humanity. But in this text and the text to follow His humanity is on display. His mother upset Him. His mother used her position of honor to provoke Jesus to disobey God’s will. He says in the passage that it is not His time. Still, He performs the miracle and allows His family to save face.

Did He have to repent? Maybe. Probably. One thing you never see in the gospel accounts again is Jesus allowing people to get Him off track. We begin to hear things like, “get behind me Satan.” You begin to hear things like, “my family is those who do God’s will.” The miracle of wine was traumatic for Jesus, or at least disturbing.


Lord Jesus, please help me not let people get me off track. Teach me to obey perfectly. Lord, I long to be counted as family. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.