The Reproach of Jesus

John 11:47-48,53-54 WEB

The chief priests therefore and the Pharisees gathered a council, and said, “What are we doing? For this man does many signs. [48] If we leave him alone like this, everyone will believe in him, and the Romans will come and take away both our place and our nation.” [53] So from that day forward they took counsel that they might put him to death. [54] Jesus therefore walked no more openly among the Jews, but departed from there into the country near the wilderness, to a city called Ephraim. He stayed there with his disciples.


It is startling to think that Jesus had to hide from the authorities. Can you see Jesus and the disciples looking around corners, being careful of where they walked? It has a dramatic flair. But it also shines the light on Jesus’ humanity. Though he was God, he functioned entirely in his humanity and made himself subject to human authority.

Jesus was humble. He took his disciples and quickly departed to the edge of the wilderness to a city called Ephraim. He could have called angels to save him from the death plot (Mat 26:53). Instead, he removes himself and his followers from the danger. Jesus does not tempt God but rather takes a more difficult path (Mat 4:7). He is obedient to the Word even though he is fleeing.

Jesus was obedient to the Word and the Spirit. This caused him to receive condemnation from those in Judea. We also receive condemnation when we obey the Word of God or walk in the Spirit. For example, the Word says not to gossip. However, gossip is a very prominent sin. To refuse to engage in gossip is to put yourself at odds with people both in and out of the church. Likewise, Jesus ran the risk of heaping more reproach upon himself with every miracle he performed and every sermon he preached.


Lord, I thank you for humbling yourself to human authority on your journey to the cross. Thank you for receiving reproach just as we receive reproach today. You are honorable in all you do Jesus. Help me be more like you, Lord. In Jesus’ name, amen.

Stressed Out Jesus

John 7:3-10 WEB

His brothers therefore said to him, “Depart from here, and go into Judea, that your disciples also may see your works which you do. [4] For no one does anything in secret, and himself seeks to be known openly. If you do these things, reveal yourself to the world.” [5] For even his brothers didn’t believe in him. [6] Jesus therefore said to them, “My time has not yet come, but your time is always ready. [7] The world can’t hate you, but it hates me, because I testify about it, that its works are evil. [8] You go up to the feast. I am not yet going up to this feast, because my time is not yet fulfilled.” [9] Having said these things to them, he stayed in Galilee. [10] But when his brothers had gone up to the feast, then he also went up, not publicly, but as it were in secret.


This is a little humorous. Actually, It’s amazing. The Lord Jesus had brothers and he argued with them, and it’s in the Bible. This is one of those passages that show Jesus was a human. Yes, he is divine, but Jesus is also human. And he cut his brothers down like a pro.

Of course, Jesus is much more than an irritable, stressed brother. He is God. Being God, his divinity pops out even when he is being defensive with his family. In verse 6 of the above passage, Jesus says, “My time has not yet come, but your time is always ready.” Jesus went right to the heart of the issue. He told his brothers they were full of themselves. He did not address their jealousy or critical spirits. Instead, he names the problem.

Pride. The brothers did not trust the Lord. They did what they wanted when they wanted, regardless of God’s timing. But Jesus did something different. He refused to think more highly of himself than he should. Jesus chose to wait for the Father’s timing. He was not in a hurry to go fluff up his audience. He wasn’t in a hurry. Jesus waited on the Father.


Lord Jesus, please forgive me for thinking too highly of myself. I repent of wanting things in my time and ask you to give me the grace to wait patiently. I trust you, Lord. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.


#Jesus #Pride #Jealousy #Christian #Key #Love #Trust #Humility #Human #Divine

Humility and Judgment

John 5:27 WEB

He also gave him authority to execute judgment, because he is a son of man.


I’m sorry, what did that say? That Jesus can execute judgment because he is a son of man? That is amazing. If Jesus had an ability based specifically on his humanity, then perhaps we have that same ability. What an enormous thought, do modern believers have the same authority to execute judgment as Jesus?

First, what does Jesus say about his authority to judge? He says, “For God didn’t send his Son into the world to judge the world, but that the world should be saved through him.” (John 3:17 WEB) So, Jesus has the authority to judge but that is not his priority. His top priority is to see the world saved. Second, in the book of Matthew, we read, “For by your words you will be justified, and by your words, you will be condemned.” (Matthew 12:37 WEB) Jesus has said the judgment comes from our words. It is not specifically that He is going to judge every microscopic thing, rather, how we conduct ourselves will judge us.

These are just two things that Jesus taught about his authority to judge. Jesus’ top priority is salvation, and he lets us judge ourselves with our words. It is ironic that the Father gives Jesus the right to judge because Jesus is humble and does not seem to want to judge anyone.  Instead, Jesus stays focused on God’s will and does not rejoice over the authority he has.

Therefore, it seems like Jesus’ current judgment is based on human attributes shared by modern believers. We all have priorities, and those priorities are reflected in our words and actions. Also, we all look at people’s behavior and make judgments. Thus, if like Jesus, we have God’s will as our top priority, we will not be that interested in judgment. However, if the time comes and a judgment must be made, we can look to the example that Jesus left us in the Bible.  


Lord Jesus, please help me love people and do all I legitimately can to see them saved. Help me have humility so that I stop judging people based on the world’s standards. And Lord, when I do have to make a judgment, let me keep your priorities so that I make righteous judgments. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.

Divinely Human

John 4:4-6 WEB

He needed to pass through Samaria. [5] So he came to a city of Samaria, called Sychar, near the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son, Joseph. [6] Jacob’s well was there. Jesus therefore, being tired from his journey, sat down by the well. It was about the sixth hour.

Jesus was a human with the same frailties all people have. In this passage, he is so exhausted he stops at the well while his disciples go on to get food. It is common for ministers and laypeople alike to frame Jesus as fully God and fail to give expression to his humanity. This is inaccurate and it causes the truth to be warped. We cannot bring a message of Jesus’ time on the earth and not discuss both his divinity and humanity. If we make him all human and only human, it is an error. However, if we make him all divine and only divine, this is also an error. It warps the text into something other than what it is. In the above text Jesus is about to introduce Samaritans to the gospel. In his weakness, his humanity, he experienced a circumstance that forces him to stop. At the same time, he is divine and is about to encounter a true sheep and then bring that person into the true fold (John 10:16).

We as believers are also human and divine in a sense. This is because Christ has made his home inside of each one of us. We can hear his voice (John 10:27). In our humanity we are frail. There are times when we will not be able to continue. We may need to rest by stopping and refreshing ourselves. However, the divine is alive within us and is almost certainly going to call us into service even in our rest. We are like Jesus when he was on earth. We are fully human and have the fulness of divinity living within us. To preach any message about Jesus that does not account for both the humanity and the divinity of Jesus is to make his works beyond ourselves. Jesus clearly taught that we would do greater things than he did (John 14:2). If we warp the message of the gospel by making Jesus so divine there is no humanity left, we disempower people from following his example.

Lord Jesus, please reveal the fullness of both your humanity and divinity so that I can share truthfully about your time on earth. I do not want to misuse your example. Please forgive me for excusing myself from things you taught and showed by ignoring the truth of your humanity. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.