Anointed to the Task

John 12:48-50 WEB

He who rejects me, and doesn’t receive my sayings, has one who judges him. The word that I spoke, the same will judge him in the last day. [49] For I spoke not from myself, but the Father who sent me, he gave me a commandment, what I should say, and what I should speak. [50] I know that his commandment is eternal life. The things therefore which I speak, even as the Father has said to me, so I speak.”


Jesus is the exact expression of the Father. He is divine. He is also human. As a human, he did things from the weakened condition of having laid down his divinity. He laid down his life and took up a life as a human. It is not a small thing when the Lord tells us to lay down our lives. Jesus is calling us into the same behaviors that he demonstrated as he walked the earth.

If Jesus did it, so can we. If Jesus could hear and follow the Father’s commands, so can we. He was human as well as divine. Jesus was so assured that he was hearing from the Father that he claimed to speak the Father’s words. Jesus was anointed. He was righteous and holy. His behavior modeled the scriptures, and his attitudes modeled the scripture. These two things made him both righteous and holy.

Righteousness and holiness opened Jesus up for an enormous anointing. His anointing was so strong that it carried him to the cross. His anointing carried him to and through his divine purpose. This is something we can imitate. We can walk in outward righteousness of choice and behavior. We can also walk in the inner attitude of Godly motive; we can be holy. We can hear from the Father, and we can understand what he says.


Lord, thank you for becoming a human and showing me how to live. Help me, Lord, to equip an anointing through the righteousness of behavior and the holiness of motive. I want to fulfill my divine purpose as you fulfilled yours. Help me to serve you, Lord. In Jesus’ name, amen.

Religion or Love?

John 9:12-16 WEB

Then they asked him, “Where is he?” He said, “I don’t know.” [13] They brought him who had been blind to the Pharisees. [14] It was a Sabbath when Jesus made the mud and opened his eyes. [15] Again therefore the Pharisees also asked him how he received his sight. He said to them, “He put mud on my eyes, I washed, and I see.” [16] Some therefore of the Pharisees said, “This man is not from God, because he doesn’t keep the Sabbath.” Others said, “How can a man who is a sinner do such signs?” There was division among them.


It was a Sabbath on which Jesus did this miracle. That means it was a Sabbath when the blind man asked to be healed. The beggar who was blind did not care about decorum or rules. He cared about his need to see. So, regardless of the day, the blind man cried out to Jesus and was healed. Not only did the blind man ask for his miracle on the Sabbath, but Jesus also honored his heart’s desire and healed him on the Sabbath.

Before the cross, the old system was still intact. Healing on the sabbath was against the religion of Judaism. As a Bible and Torah believing Jew, Jesus should have been shocked at the bold request. Instead, the blind sinner was healed. Jesus cared more about the blind man than he cared about the rules. He knew the rules and honored them. But when a human need arose, the rules no longer mattered.

The human in the story is what matters most. The blind beggar was a poor and broken man, but God raised him up to eternal glory and honor by including his story in the Bible. He sinned his way to wholeness. Have you ever met a poor beggar? How about a homeless person? Their focus is on their need, not the rules. And God honors them as human beings. God does not withhold his comfort because of this man’s sin. The beggar asked God for help. So, regardless of his lifestyle, God reached out to him and healed him.


Lord, deliver me from a religious spirit so I can love others as you love me. Help me see people as you see them. Help me, love, as you love. In Jesus’ name, amen.

Slow, like Jesus

John 8:1-8 WEB

but Jesus went to the Mount of Olives. [2] Now very early in the morning, he came again into the temple, and all the people came to him. He sat down, and taught them. [3] The scribes and the Pharisees brought a woman taken in adultery. Having set her in the middle, [4] they told him, “Teacher, we found this woman in adultery, in the very act. [5] Now in our law, Moses commanded us to stone such women. What then do you say about her?” [6] They said this testing him, that they might have something to accuse him of. But Jesus stooped down, and wrote on the ground with his finger. [7] But when they continued asking him, he looked up and said to them, “He who is without sin among you, let him throw the first stone at her.” [8] Again he stooped down, and with his finger wrote on the ground.


Jesus is humble. We cannot know what Jesus wrote in the dirt. What is significant is he took the time to hear from God before he answered. Jesus had enough humility to slow down and listen before he blurted out the first thing that came to mind. I wonder though, why did Jesus take time here when in other places he does not? The answer is probably simple, a human’s life was on the line. This time there was more at stake than Jesus’ reputation. Another human’s life is in his hands. So, he slows down. He doesn’t presume upon his anointing.

He had the humility to pray for an answer. After he answered the Pharisees, he stoops down again. This is the one that intrigues me. I can understand why he took time to answer, but why is he taking time now? I suspect it was to say thanks to the Father. If I were in that situation, I would be profoundly grateful to the Father for giving me wisdom. And despite his divinity, Jesus is also human. That means he had human frailties.

If Jesus was bound to human frailties, how much more are we? I see Jesus taking extra time when another human beings’ welfare is on the line. It makes me realize, I need to slow down when I am giving answers that impact others. I used to drive the church van. While working with the van ministry I watched people fall away if any word of direction was given to them on the bus. For example, if someone brought an open container, we would have to tell them they could not bring it on the van.

People would get offended, and we would not see them again. Then one day, a woman with 3 rowdy children held the bus for 20 minutes before they were all on board. I did not want to lose this family. So, instead of saying something I went home and fasted for two weeks. I asked the Father to go before me and help me say what I needed to say to keep the van running smoothly.

When I brought the subject up, she was receptive to what I said. She did not get upset and fall away. Instead, she changed her behavior and started being ready on time to go to church. It was a profound experience for me because it highlighted how precious every person is to God. It taught me to go slow when I am interacting with others. More, it taught me to take time to first hear from the Father.


Lord Jesus, please help me grow in humility that I would always go slow and wait for you, especially when another’s welfare is involved. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.

Stressed Out Jesus

John 7:3-10 WEB

His brothers therefore said to him, “Depart from here, and go into Judea, that your disciples also may see your works which you do. [4] For no one does anything in secret, and himself seeks to be known openly. If you do these things, reveal yourself to the world.” [5] For even his brothers didn’t believe in him. [6] Jesus therefore said to them, “My time has not yet come, but your time is always ready. [7] The world can’t hate you, but it hates me, because I testify about it, that its works are evil. [8] You go up to the feast. I am not yet going up to this feast, because my time is not yet fulfilled.” [9] Having said these things to them, he stayed in Galilee. [10] But when his brothers had gone up to the feast, then he also went up, not publicly, but as it were in secret.


This is a little humorous. Actually, It’s amazing. The Lord Jesus had brothers and he argued with them, and it’s in the Bible. This is one of those passages that show Jesus was a human. Yes, he is divine, but Jesus is also human. And he cut his brothers down like a pro.

Of course, Jesus is much more than an irritable, stressed brother. He is God. Being God, his divinity pops out even when he is being defensive with his family. In verse 6 of the above passage, Jesus says, “My time has not yet come, but your time is always ready.” Jesus went right to the heart of the issue. He told his brothers they were full of themselves. He did not address their jealousy or critical spirits. Instead, he names the problem.

Pride. The brothers did not trust the Lord. They did what they wanted when they wanted, regardless of God’s timing. But Jesus did something different. He refused to think more highly of himself than he should. Jesus chose to wait for the Father’s timing. He was not in a hurry to go fluff up his audience. He wasn’t in a hurry. Jesus waited on the Father.


Lord Jesus, please forgive me for thinking too highly of myself. I repent of wanting things in my time and ask you to give me the grace to wait patiently. I trust you, Lord. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.


#Jesus #Pride #Jealousy #Christian #Key #Love #Trust #Humility #Human #Divine

I See You, Jesus

John 6:67-70 WEB

Jesus said therefore to the twelve, “You don’t also want to go away, do you?” [68] Simon Peter answered him, “Lord, to whom would we go? You have the words of eternal life. [69] We have come to believe and know that you are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” [70] Jesus answered them, “Didn’t I choose you, the twelve, and one of you is a devil?”


I love this passage because twice it shows the Lord’s human vulnerability. Jesus and the disciples just experienced a ministry disaster. The Lord, teaching under the inspiration of the Spirit of God, told everyone to eat his flesh and drink his blood. Nearly all of Jesus’ followers left.

Can you imagine someone telling people to eat and drink them? The disciples who did not truly believe did not trust, so they left. And Jesus was left with the twelve. Notice in the verse he is specific when he says, “Didn’t I choose you, the twelve, and one of you is a devil?” Jesus was just a little proud. Just a little human. Just a little vulnerable. And so easy to overlook.

Part of the joy for me in reading the Bible is finding these little nuggets. Every verse that tells me about Jesus’ humanity is golden. More, verses in which I can see Jesus’ personality are special treasures. Jesus is our special treasure, and I love meeting him in the Bible.


Lord Jesus, please help me notice scriptures that give insight into your walk as a human. Help me know you better. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.

Divinely Human

John 6:66-67 WEB

At this, many of his disciples went back, and walked no more with him. [67] Jesus said therefore to the twelve, “You don’t also want to go away, do you?”


Jesus felt the sting of betrayal. In the above passage, you can see the undercurrent of pain in his words. I think about Jesus rebuking his mother at the wedding at Cana (John 2:4). I think about the temple when Jesus took a whip of cords and destroyed the market (John 2:14-16). I think about Jesus weeping for Lazarus (John 11:34-36). All these examples tell a story about the personality of Jesus. He was capable of exuberant emotional responses.

Jesus had several emotional responses recorded in the Bible. However, we are frequently so focused on his divinity, we bypass a human explanation for his recorded behavior. Yet, we know, Jesus suffered all things to purchase our freedom (Heb 2:17-18). If he didn’t experience the human dilemma of emotional turbulence, he did not suffer all things. Jesus was divine by nature. All he was flowed through his human experience.

It is easier to think of Jesus as so divine that his deeds are beyond human ability or responsibility. To think of the Lord as human places a burden of responsibility on us. If he was fully human as much as he is fully divine, his example is valid for me to imitate. The Bible tells us we will do greater works than Jesus (John 14:11). Our Lord was a conduit for others into the presence of the Father (John 5:19). He was holy (Rom 1:4-6).


Lord Jesus, please help me discover nuances of your personality in scripture. I want to know you. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.

Divinely Human

John 4:4-6 WEB

He needed to pass through Samaria. [5] So he came to a city of Samaria, called Sychar, near the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son, Joseph. [6] Jacob’s well was there. Jesus therefore, being tired from his journey, sat down by the well. It was about the sixth hour.

Jesus was a human with the same frailties all people have. In this passage, he is so exhausted he stops at the well while his disciples go on to get food. It is common for ministers and laypeople alike to frame Jesus as fully God and fail to give expression to his humanity. This is inaccurate and it causes the truth to be warped. We cannot bring a message of Jesus’ time on the earth and not discuss both his divinity and humanity. If we make him all human and only human, it is an error. However, if we make him all divine and only divine, this is also an error. It warps the text into something other than what it is. In the above text Jesus is about to introduce Samaritans to the gospel. In his weakness, his humanity, he experienced a circumstance that forces him to stop. At the same time, he is divine and is about to encounter a true sheep and then bring that person into the true fold (John 10:16).

We as believers are also human and divine in a sense. This is because Christ has made his home inside of each one of us. We can hear his voice (John 10:27). In our humanity we are frail. There are times when we will not be able to continue. We may need to rest by stopping and refreshing ourselves. However, the divine is alive within us and is almost certainly going to call us into service even in our rest. We are like Jesus when he was on earth. We are fully human and have the fulness of divinity living within us. To preach any message about Jesus that does not account for both the humanity and the divinity of Jesus is to make his works beyond ourselves. Jesus clearly taught that we would do greater things than he did (John 14:2). If we warp the message of the gospel by making Jesus so divine there is no humanity left, we disempower people from following his example.

Lord Jesus, please reveal the fullness of both your humanity and divinity so that I can share truthfully about your time on earth. I do not want to misuse your example. Please forgive me for excusing myself from things you taught and showed by ignoring the truth of your humanity. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.

The Word Became Flesh

John 1:14 WEB

The Word became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth.


The Word became flesh. Jesus is called the word in the Book of John. In fact, the first verse in the Book of John says, “in the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and the Word was God.” When I see Jesus became the word, I wonder if it’s the voice of God that became flesh through Jesus Christ. Thus, in the beginning was The Voice, and it was God’s Voice. And through God’s Voice, all things were created and nothing was created without God’s Voice.

Then, is Jesus God? Is Jesus divine? The spirit inside of Jesus was from the Father directly (Luke 1:35). So yes, Jesus is divine (Phil 2:5-7). Yet, Jesus testified that the Father was one (Mark 12:29). Conversely, Jesus also testified he and the Father were one (John 10:30). However, that most likely meant the same thing it means for you and me. We are all one with God but that does not make us God (John 14:20). We have God’s voice inside of us but that also does not make us God (Mark 13:11).

I believe Jesus and God are one and the same. But we have a human element we’re dealing with that may not be God. My concern is when Jesus returns to Earth we are going to be dealing with a human element and it’s probably going to be a different human element. Unless Christs’ body is able to exist where he is, with the Father, when he returns the Father will have to give him another one.

If Jesus returns as a baby, will he have the same memories? Will he know who he is? Will he have to grow in stature and grace (Luke 2:52)? Jesus testifies he is the same yesterday today and tomorrow (Heb 13:8). That is why I think we should expect something similar with Christ’s second return to what we had for his first coming (Luke 2:7). That is a human being that has to be born, come to an awareness of who they are, then grow in grace and stature. I believe this is one possible way Jesus will return.


Lord Jesus, I ask that you give each one of us a revelation regarding your return. We know that you come back victorious, but we do not know the journey you have to take to that victory. Give us eyes to see, ears to hear, and a willing and tender heart. In Jesus’ name, I pray, amen.